Whether you’re silent and still or thrash around like a wild whale, each and every one of us has a unique sleeping pattern and according to experts, it can reveal so much about our health and wellness.

Analysing data from over 3400 sleepers, the sleep experts from mattress brand Simba have developed nine sleep personas – Wriggler, Heavy Sleeper, Catcher Upper, Thinker, Early Bird, Light Sleeper, Night Owl, Maverick and Sleep Master – with their specific characteristics.

Wriggler

These sleepers wriggle around like an energetic worm, so are probably not completing 5 cycles of sleep so missing out on restorative Stage 3 and mind and mood-boosting REMs sleep.

They can’t seem to stay still long enough to relax and stay asleep – which might mean they’re not completing all the cycles of sleep they need. With some help, they could find ways to get comfy and settle through the night

Tip: The 4-7-8 breathing method can help calm before they for sleep. Breathe in for a steady count of 4 – hold for 7 – breathe out for 8 (This person can skip the middle stage if they struggle to hold their breath).

Early Bird

Because this person wakes early they don’t get 8 hours sleep so they’re missing out on some restorative deep sleep and mind and mood-boosting REMs

This person’s natural 24-hour body clock (or circadian rhythm) is in a slightly earlier time zone than everyone else. This means that they feel tired earlier in the evening, but bounce out of bed in the morning feeling wide awake. Some might envy this person, but early birds don’t do as well with late nights, so this person should listen to their body and turn in when they’re tired

Tip: If they’ve got light blinds or thin curtains, look at using thicker, darker fabric or getting a separate blackout blind for their bedroom windows. And if they find them comfortable, sleep masks might help blot out street lights or summer dawns that will wake them too early. This person should try to get as much natural light as possible from the moment they wake up! It’ll boost their mood and help regulate this person’s body clock for the night ahead.

Heavy Sleeper

They don’t fall into deep sleep until later in their sleep, which means they sleep longer to get the restorative deep sleep they need.

They’re one of those people who can sleep through anything – including the alarm – but in spite of this when they do finally stir from their slumber they still don’t feel great. It could just be that they’re trying to rouse themselves in the deepest phase of their sleep cycle when this person’s brain is least alert. Adjusting their bedtime could help them wake up ready to take on the day.

Tip: A gentle stretch before bed can help improve circulation, encourage better spinal alignment and, combined with controlled breathing, calm the body and mind for quality sleep.

Light Sleeper


Although this person might be sleeping for 8 hours, they’re not getting enough cycles of restorative Stage 3 and mind and mood-boosting REMs sleep.

As quickly as they drift off, they bounce back to wakefulness. That might not bother this person, but whatever is preventing them from drifting into a deeper phase of sleep is also stopping them enjoying all the restorative benefits of non-REM rest. This person should try tweaking their environment to help them get their full sleep phases.

Tip: Managing light levels can help keep this person’s body clock well-regulated. A bright lunchtime walk in natural sunshine, a dimly lit living room in the evening and a dark bedroom will all help regulate their production of the sleep-inducing hormone melatonin. If they’ve got light blinds or thin curtains, look at using thicker, darker fabric or getting a separate blackout blind. And if they find them comfortable, sleep masks might help blot out street lights or summer dawns that will wake them too early.

Thinker

They’re not completing 5 cycles of sleep so missing out on restorative Stage 3 and mind and mood-boosting REMs sleep.

Either they can’t get to sleep, or they get to sleep only to wake up again in the early hours. This confuses this person’s body clock and can lead to a cycle of disturbed sleep. Better ways to wind down are key to getting their body and mind on board with bedtime.

Tip: Take regular short breaks during the day – it helps regulate this person’s daily rhythms as well as helping their creativity and productivity so they don’t stress over their to do list. This person should dedicate the last hour of their day to household tasks and make a ‘to do’ list for the next day. In the evening, they should try to do something that’s the opposite of what they do at work. If they sit all day, then they should try some yoga or a walk. This person should not check their emails before going to bed!

Catcher Upper

They are not allowing themselves enough time to complete 5 cycles of normal sleep, so they’re missing out on the some restorative deep sleep and mind and mood-boosting REMs.

This person burns the candle at both ends for most of the week then try to catch up the lost hours of sleep on their days off. Unfortunately, they can’t put off catching up on sleep until later — if they’re running short, they have 24 hours at most to get more rest in. What’s more, lie ins just confuse this person’s body clock and make them groggier when it’s time to work. Avoiding this ‘social jet lag’ is key for getting their sleep back on track.

Tip: If they’re a napper by habit, try and keep it to the earlier part of the day, preferably before 2pm. Napping into the late afternoon is likely to affect their sleep at night. If this person is waking up from a nap feeling a bit groggy, it’s likely they’re in the middle of a deep sleep phase – so either cut their naps shorter (less than 30 mins) or complete a full sleep cycle.

Maverick

This person’s sleep pattern is off the scale. They should be getting 5 complete cycles of deep restorative stage 3 sleep and mind and mood-boosting REMs sleep.

The one thing that their body clock really loves is a routine — and they don’t have one. The lack of consistency in their schedule makes it hard for their body clock to stay calibrated, so they might well see the consequences in their performance, health, mood and sleep patterns. Try giving their sleep life some structure for just one week, and see how they feel.

Tip: Keeping a regular schedule – even at weekends – is great for regulating their body clock and helping them get the hours that they need.

Sleep Master

This person has nailed it. They are totally in tune with their natural body clock and their sleep pattern is near perfect. They gently drift off, dream, and wake naturally, feeling rested and ready for another day. Whatever they’re doing to help them sleep so well, keep doing it.

Tip – It looks like other sleepers could probably take advice from this person! We’ve added a few tips that are good for everyone, to help keep them at the top of their game.

Night Owl

This person goes to bed later than most and wake before they’ve completed 5 cycles of normal sleep. Looks like they’re missing out on the some restorative deep sleep and mind and mood-boosting.

Their natural 24 hr body clock (or circadian rhythm) is in a slightly later time zone than everyone else. This means that they don’t feel naturally tired until late at night. Owls are not at their best first thing and likely to rise a little later than most people, which isn’t a problem unless they have to rise early for work. Adjusting this person’s schedule by as little as an hour could help.

Tip: A gentle stretch before bed can help improve circulation, encourage better spinal alignment and, combined with controlled breathing, calm the body and mind for quality sleep.

Sweet dreams! Zzzzzz.





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