New research reveals how some of British TV’s most iconic homes would be valued today, from Sherlock’s Baker Street shack to Del Boy’s Peckham pad…

We all know that London’s property prices can be pretty off the scale, but how much would Sherlock’s famed flat at 22b Baker Street fetch on the market today? Or how about Del Boy’s Peckham pad from Only Fools & Horses? And how would the Peep Show lads fair if they flogged their Croydon crib?

Research carried out by Attic Self Storage reveals all, and even goes so far as to create floor plans for each of these iconic homes to illustrate how some of TV’s most iconic characters make use of their square footage. Just how much should Sherlock be paying per square foot in 2019? And could Del Boy have finally made his first million if he flogged his flat today?

After crunching the numbers, it looks like Sherlock’s shack would cost in the region of £468,000 today, despite its rather poky proportions. The floor plan for London’s most famous detective was actually the trickiest to deduce for this study, given that you never see Dr Watson’s bedroom on the show.

Analysts deduced that it must be a one-bedroom flat with an estimated living space is 44m² – that’s £10,636 per m². In pricier postcodes, it would be worth just shy of £900,000, whereas cheaper areas would see it go for just over £150,000.

Del Boy Trotter’s flat from Only Fools & Horses, located at Nelson Mandela House in Peckham, is roomier than Sherlock’s – a three-bed property estimated to measure around 71.6 m² – and as such would go for just short of £500k, or £497,000 (£6,941 per m²) to be precise. Still coming up short on that first million, Del Boy! However, the same three-bed apartment would be worth over £1.3m a few miles down the road in Chelsea…

Heading further south to Croydon, Mark and Jez’s 75m² flat from Peep Show would now cost £360,000, or £4,800 per m²). The same space in Chelsea would be worth four times that amount, coming in at nearly £1.5 million.

‘The study raises interesting questions about the extent to which people will sacrifice floor space to live in a more desirable area’

The data shows the sizeable disparity in housing prices not just across London, but across the nation. As the first episode of the fifth series of Peaky Blinders, which premieres on BBC1 on 18 July, for example, Birmingham-based gangster Tommy Shelby is in for a shock when he moves to the capital.

Season 4 ended with Shelby winning the parliamentary seat for Birmingham South. Relocating to London to take up his seat might require a little downsizing… The Peaky Blinders gang’s betting shop and HQ, cunningly disguised as a house in Small Heath in Birmingham, comes in at under £230,000, while a similar property in Chelsea would cost a cool £3 million.

How much would the Peaky Blinders home/HQ in Birmingham cost in London?

Inside the Peaky Blinders home/HQ in Birmingham

He could always try Romford, however, which measured as the cheapest postcode in London for price per square foot, where a similar sized property would come in at £620,000.

Frederic de Ryckman de Betz, CEO of Attic Self Storage, said: ‘We meet lots of people moving house for a variety of reasons; be it a new job, an expanding family or a change in circumstances.

‘While we are quite sure our customers don’t sit at the head of fictional crime families, many of them can relate to the experience of moving to a new city for a new job. Because of this, we wanted to explore just how much floor space your money could buy in different parts of the country.

‘While we weren’t surprised that there were large variations between house prices around England, by applying our research to some of British TV’s most iconic homes, we have come up with a unique way of illustrating the sometimes shocking disparity in prices.

‘This raises interesting questions about the extent to which people will sacrifice floor space to live in a more desirable area or are prepared to move house in order to get more space for their money.’

Find the full results of the study at Attic Self Storage



 



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